Dr. Hotze and Dr. Carolyn Dean on The Mineral You Can’t Live Without

By: | Tags: , , , | Comments: 0 | December 8th, 2017

Dr. Hotze interviews Dr. Carolyn Dean on the importance of magnesium for good health.

Video Highlights

1:14: Dr. Hotze: We’re pleased to have with us today, Dr. Carolyn Dean. Dr. Dean, that’s spelled D-E-A-N; Dr. Dean is a medical doctor, MD, and she is also a naturopathic doctor, an ND. She received, first, her medical degree in Canada, and then she subsequently went on to get a naturopathic doctor degree, an ND. Obviously, her whole career, even before she went to medical school, she’s always had a strong interest in looking at natural, safe, effective approaches to helping people obtain and maintain health and wellness naturally.

6:34: Dr. Hotze:  If you have adequate magnesium, your body is going to function well at the biochemical level, all the biochemical processes at the cellular level. If you don’t have enough magnesium, it can lead to a host of health problems that your conventional doctor will treat with toxic pharmaceutical prescriptions that will make you sicker, quicker.

12:48: Dr. Carolyn Dean:  I was asked to write this book on magnesium and I thought, well, that’s crazy, writing a 300 page book on one mineral, but the more I looked into it, the more I realized that my own heart palpitations, horrible Charley horse leg cramps, some insomnia, some neck tension from all my typing, were all magnesium deficient.

15:34: Dr. Carolyn Dean:  What I found is there are so many magnesium deficiency symptoms that are misdiagnosed and treated as diseases, and we find that when we can saturate a person with non-laxative magnesium, then many conditions of magnesium deficiency are alleviated, like acid reflux, which is often a spasm of the lower esophageal sphincter. What we know about magnesium is it relaxes muscles, whereas calcium tightens muscles.

18:16: Dr. Hotze: …we know that high blood pressure, one of the most common causes of high blood pressure is hypo…that means “low”…low magnesium levels. Magnesium dilates up the that

21:43: Dr. Carolyn Dean: …magnesium is a natural calcium channel blocker.

23:34: Dr. Hotze:  The studies I’ve read, at least 90% of the population does not even take the adequate amount of magnesium in their diet.

24:49: Stacey B.: Migraines were my problem. That was my symptom du jour. I suffered from that for many, many years, and it really affected my quality of life, and I was the one that had to leave parties early, or never go at all, because of my migraines. It didn’t just affect me; it affected the people around me.

26:25: Stacey B.: Oh. Well, they have been completely resolved. I haven’t had a migraine in a few years now. Every once in awhile, I’ll get a headache, but it’s completely manageable. My migraines have been cured and I know it’s been because of a magnesium deficiency; that’s what it was.

27:08: Dr. Hotze:  Now, listen. Migraine headaches can be caused by magnesium deficiency, and you can tell what’s causing the problem, basically, by when these migraines occur. If they occur any time of the month, and they’re not related to the cyclical events of your menstrual cycle, then they may be, as a result, a magnesium deficiency. We find also that women that end up having a migraine premenstrually oftentimes benefit from progesterone. They have a progesterone deficiency, and progesterone can resolve the migraine headaches.

30:22: Dr. Hotze: Magnesium also, as you mentioned, you had some problem with cardiac arrhythmia, irregular beats in your heart, and that magnesium also regulates your heart rhythm. That’s why, when people came into the emergency room with a heart attack and they had an irregular rhythm, I would immediately order magnesium sulfate IV, because they had low magnesium levels. If you have cramping, muscle cramping, then, what you need to do is take magnesium. That’s a common sign of magnesium deficiency.

31:15:  Magnesium is so critical for the production of energy within your cells. All your cells have power plants.

Video Transcript

Stacey B.: Welcome to Dr. Hotze’s Wellness Revolution. This is Stacey Bandfield

here with Dr. Dr. Hotze, founder of the Hotze Health and Wellness Center. Please, go to our website, HotzePodcast.com, to download all of our podcasts. That’s H-O-T-Z-E-Podcast.com.

Now, Dr. Hotze, I am so excited about our guest today. She is an amazing doctor. I have a personal stake in this, because I suffered from some conditions for a long time, until we ran across a really important mineral, and I know that changed my life, and it can change others’ lives as well.

Dr. Hotze: And that mineral was…

Stacey B.: Magnesium!

Dr. Hotze: Magnesium. We’re pleased to have with us today, Dr. Dr. Carolyn Dean. Dr. Dean, that’s spelled D-E-A-N; Dr. Dean is a medical doctor, MD, and she is also a naturopathic doctor, an ND. She received, first, her medical degree in Canada, and then she subsequently went on to get a naturopathic doctor degree, an ND. Obviously, her whole career, even before she went to medical school, she’s always had a strong interest in looking at natural, safe, effective approaches to helping people obtain and maintain health and wellness naturally. Dr. Dean, welcome!

Dr. Carolyn DeanDr. Carolyn Dean: Thank you, Dr. Hotze. Good to be here. Aloha to you, too, Stacey.

Stacey B.: Oh, “Aloha.” I love that.

Dr. Hotze: Well, you’re out suffering in…

Stacey B.: Suffering in Hawaii.

 

Dr. Hotze: … suffering in Hawaii. It’s a tough life.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: It’s terrible, just terrible, sitting here, looking at a paradise, I’ll tell you.

Stacey B.: Wow.

Dr. Hotze: Well, Dr. Dean, tell us about your career. When you were a young woman, what made you develop an interest, even before you got into medical school, about natural approaches to health?

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Well, my husband and I traveled when we were young, and instead of getting involved in the hippie revolution, we made a road from Nova Scotia over to California. I dropped in on all the lectures being given by Pabo Arolla and Carlton Fredericks. All the big nutritional gurus at the time where we were living in LA, I was close to where they would have their conferences, so I was intrigued. I read everything I could and, back then, you could read everything. I guess I just decided…actually, I was in honors biology, and some young men in my biology classes said they just got accepted into medical school and I thought that’s crazy, I know more about medicine and health than these guys will ever know.

I marched over to the Dean of Medicine office, and who was there but my high school guidance teacher, who told me I could be an executive secretary or a nurse, even though I was always in the top three of the whole school, Vice President of the Student Council.  Back then, in the, well, that was the late ’60s or early ’70s, women didn’t go into medicine. I righted that wrong, got into the next semester of med school. I just happened to have all the prerequisites and high marks. I never looked back. In medicine, as you know, Dr. Hotze, it can be pretty soul destroying, especially when you’re on a mission to keep people healthy instead of just trying to find out what’s wrong and give them a drug. I did think that, after 20, 30, now 40, years, that health and medicine would be more combined, where we would have the option of alternatives, it wouldn’t just be about drugs, because, when I did my naturopathic training, I just learned how effective they could be. I’m just appalled that now we’re in HMO medicine, doctors spend five to seven minutes; they’re trying to pay off their half million dollar student loans for studying medicine so they’re not going to rock the boat; they’re followed by certain valuations of their performance for procedures they do, what drugs they give, not on healing or curing a patient.

It’s gotten totally out of hand, and that’s why centers like yours, the Health and Wellness Center, are so vital, because there are so few doctors performing any sort of nutritional medicine.

Dr. Hotze: Well, that’s exactly right, and we’re pleased to have the opportunity to enable our guests to do just that: Get on a path of health and wellness naturally. As a matter of fact, Dr. Dean, I believe this, that every individual needs to have a health coach, a doctor and a staff of professionals, who will coach them onto a path of health and wellness naturally, so they enjoy a better quality of life. I know that makes sense with you. I’m wondering if, our listeners, does that make sense to you? Well, if it does, then you need to listen up to this program, particularly about the concept of magnesium and the absolutely critical and essential role it plays in literally hundreds of biochemical reactions in your body.

If you have adequate magnesium, your body is going to function well at the biochemical level, all the biochemical processes at the cellular level. If you don’t have enough magnesium, it can lead to a host of health problems that your conventional doctor will treat with toxic pharmaceutical prescriptions that will make you sicker, quicker.

Doctor, tell us now, you went back to medical school in Canada? Isn’t that right?

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Yes, that’s right; I’m a Canadian. Actually, now-

Dr. Hotze: A Canuck! A Canuck, they say.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: No, no. We got our American citizenship last year.

Dr. Hotze:       Okay.

Stacey B.: Oh! Congratulations.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Thank you.

Dr. Hotze: A former Canuck!

Dr. Carolyn Dean: A former Canuck, and I’m happy to be here. You know, I have a company here. I love Hawaii. I tell people I’m a Hawaiian.

Dr. Hotze: Tell me this, you grew up in Nova Scotia?

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Dr. Hotze: What area?

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Dartmouth Halifax.

Dr. Hotze: Okay, you grew up in the Halifax area. I just recently, this last summer, went to Nova Scotia, and I went to Cape Breton Island, up by Inverness, and up to Baddeck, and up to Ingonish on a golf trip, and it is the most beautiful island ever. Cape Breton is part of Nova Scotia, but it’s the northern part of Nova Scotia, and it’s an island. It’s absolutely, stunningly beautiful.

Stacey B.: Didn’t you say it’s more Scottish than Scotland?

Dr. Hotze: It was so Scottish up there, my goodness. Almost…

Stacey B.: All I thought was that was amazing.

Dr. Hotze: I mean, everybody, 80% of the people had, “Mac,” to begin their name. MacDonald, MacGinnnish, MacMillan, MacMullen.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Well, Stacey, Nova Scotia means, “New Scotland.”

Dr. Hotze: Right. Sure.

Stacey B.: Well, there you go. Makes sense now.

Dr. Hotze: Sure, it’s Latin for, “New Scotland,” and the Scots settled all over the island, but, boy, they’re predominant up there, and they have even Gaelic University up there and the signs are both in English and in Gaelic, which was very, very fascinating. It’s a beautiful island. Did you go to medical school there, in Nova Scotia?

Dr. Carolyn Dean: I did, because that’s where I lived. There were no naturopathic schools. I might’ve done that, but there wasn’t even a naturopathic school in all of Canada, back then. Yeah, I went to Dalhousie University. At the time, in North America, it was the most dedicated school to performance. In third year medicine at Dalhousie, we had to write fourth year American boards and pass them.

Dr. Hotze:       Wow.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: We were supposed to be one year ahead, and that served me well, because what happened then is, because my husband worked with Marshall McLewan, he wanted to be up near him in Toronto, Canada, and I was transferred over to another medical school. It had never been done before, but they were on a tutorial system, so they wanted to see how someone would survive if they parachuted in. They didn’t know me, because I can survive anywhere. I had so much book learning and even hospital education, that I didn’t have to study all year for the end of the year final exams, but these poor guys in tutorials, who’d never really cracked a book, they studied all year, so I roved the clinical wards and, eventually, I was a clinical clerk, but, eventually, I was learning things in intern would or resident would and I was doing procedures. When I did my internship, I just flew through it. I never did a specialty. I didn’t even stay around for a family medicine specialty. I went right into practice, and it was awesome.

Dr. Hotze: You stayed in Canada for how many years?

Dr. Carolyn Dean: 13 years, I was in Canada. I had my own private practice, and then, I get involved with a…

Dr. Hotze: Where were you located in Canada? Where did you have your practice?

Dr. Carolyn Dean: In Toronto.

Dr. Hotze: I see.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Yeah, big city. Then, I got involved with a homeopathic acupuncture technique that treated AIDS and chronic fatigue. Now, those were both kind of fairly new conditions back in the late ’80s, early ’90s, and I got invited to go to New York to do research, so I took a sabbatical and went to New York, but there’s a whole story around that. Just before I left town, the licensing board came after me, because I said bad things about sugar on a national TV show.

Stacey B.: Oh, my goodness.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Yeah. I know.

Dr. Hotze: I don’t think they have freedom of speech in the UK. I mean, they can come after you. We can at least talk about the adverse affects of sugar. What I’m most interested in, and why I wanted you on the program today, was to tell us about how did you discover magnesium as a therapeutic agent in helping people obtaining and maintaining health and wellness naturally?

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Well, I learned about magnesium in naturopathic school. I knew about it before in medical school, because I read Prevention Magazine and all, but in medicine, they never broached the topic about clinical application of magnesium, even though, when we had our biochemistry courses, the slides, save the Kreb cycle, show that six of the eight steps in the Kreb cycle, to make your energy, required magnesium.

Dr. Hotze: Right.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: It was such an oversight. I learned about it, but then, it was not until Random House Valentine Books asked me to write a book on magnesium, because I’d been doing a number of television shows in New York, I was on The View and did all kinds of things, and 12:48:  I was asked to write this book on magnesium and I thought, well, that’s crazy, writing a 300 page book on one mineral, but the more I looked into it, the more I realized that my own heart palpitations, horrible Charley horse leg cramps, some insomnia, some neck tension from all my typing, were all magnesium deficiency. I was very much benefited by researching and writing this book, but then I came to find, when I tried to take magnesium for my symptoms, I got a horrible laxative effect.

Dr. Hotze: And?

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Well, then, because I was the darling of the magnesium industry, they used my book to sell their products, I tried to encourage them to make a non-laxative magnesium. They said, “Oh, it’s too much research, too expensive, too much education.” 13:45:    I finally created, with the help of an awesome chemist, my own non-laxative magnesium and I’ve been working with that for five years now.

Dr. Hotze: And that’s called ReMag.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: That’s right.

Dr. Hotze: ReMag has magnesium chloride in it…

Dr. Carolyn Dean: That’s right.

Dr. Hotze: You’re telling me that the laxative effect of magnesium chloride in your liquid ReMag preparation of magnesium has a lower laxative effect than if you were to take oral tablets or capsules of magnesium, citrate and glycinate?

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Yes, that’s right. It’s an incredible proprietary procedure. It’s got 18 steps to create a stabilized ion of magnesium that allows that specific magnesium ion to be slurped up into the cells and be absorbed at the cellular level. It’s all going into the cells, and there’s not much left to go into the intestines, the bowels, to create a laxative effect, because the fail safe of magnesium is actually the laxative effect. That’s what makes it the safest supplement you can take, and the first supplement that I tell people to take.

Dr. Hotze: Tell us about the various symptoms and disorders for which magnesium can be used?

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Well, this is interesting, because the FDA doesn’t really want us to say that magnesium (deficiency) causes diseases, so I like the way you say, “Symptoms.” 15:34:   What I found is there are so many magnesium deficiency symptoms that are misdiagnosed and treated as diseases, and we find that when we can saturate a person with non-laxative magnesium, then many conditions of magnesium deficiency are alleviated, like acid reflux, which is often a spasm of the lower esophageal sphincter. What we know about magnesium is it relaxes muscles, whereas calcium tightens muscles.

Dr. Hotze: Right.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: We have to be aware that giving people calcium, which is very poorly absorbed, which can precipitate in the body, which can irritate muscles and nerves, can cause a spasm, especially if you don’t have enough magnesium. 16:32:   Then, there’s adrenal fatigue, Alzheimer’s, angina, anxiety and panic attacks, arthritis, asthma, 16:43 artherosclerosis, bowel diseases, brain dysfunction…

Stacey B.: My goodness.

Dr. Hotze: Hypertension.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Oh, yeah. I’m getting there; I’m only on the Bs.

Stacey B.: Just started.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: It’s just crazy. Yeah.

Symptoms Caused By Magnesium Deficiency

  • heart attacks
  • hypertension
  • even cholesterol elevation
  • chronic fatigue
  • depression
  • diabetes
  • any sort of fatigue
  • headaches, especially migraines
  • hypoglycemia
  • inflammation anywhere in the body
  • insomnia
  • kidney disease
  • kidney stones
  • any sort of musculoskeletal condition, you know, with cramps and pain and spasms
  • any sort of nerve problem with horrible burning pain, numbness and weakness

Women who have preeclampsia or eclampsia, what they do, as you know, in the hospitals, they’ll put an IV of magnesium.

Dr. Hotze: Right. Of course, when I did emergency medicine, if somebody would come in with a heart attack and had an arrhythmia, immediately, we’ll give them 2,000 milligrams of mag sulfate.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Dr. Hotze: Now, I understand they no longer do that, and I hope they still use magnesium for problems with eclampsia and preeclampsia conditions. I know this: we have seen numerous guests come into the Hotze Health & Wellness Center trying to get their health back. They come in, many on a host of various pharmaceutical drugs, commonly high blood pressure medication, and 18:16:   we know that high blood pressure, one of the most common causes of high blood pressure is hypo…that means “low”…low magnesium levels. Magnesium dilates up the smooth muscles in the arteries, which make them more open, and it lowers the blood pressure.

There are numerous guests that we have treated here at the Hotze Health & Wellness Center on our program, which isn’t just magnesium alone. We believe in a full complement of the vitamins, plus supplemental natural hormones, the thyroid, the female or male hormones, and support the adrenal gland with some cortisol when indicated. The combination of that, but, predominantly, I’ve taken people with magnesium alone and got them off their blood pressure medications. It’s simple.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Oh, yeah.

Dr. Hotze: Listen, folks. If you go to the doctor’s office and they say, “Well, you have high blood pressure,” your first question should be: “Why? Why do I have high blood pressure?” It’s not a diagnosis. This is a problem with most doctors, is that they label your symptom. “High blood pressure” is a symptom of an underlying problem. The question is: What is the cause? What is the diagnosis of that symptom of high blood pressure? Very commonly, it’s hypomagnesemia, low magnesium, which can be easily corrected. We encourage our guests… This is what you ought to do. You talk to your doctor and he says, “You have high blood pressure.” You can go, “Why?” Well, that’s the worst thing you can ask a doctor. He could go, “Well, people just get it as they get older. You need to lose weight and exercise more, but we’re going to put you on some high blood pressure medication.” Well, a common cause of high blood pressure is white coat syndrome.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: It is.

Dr. Hotze: 25% of people who go into a doctor’s office, when they get their blood pressure checked, their pressure is elevated. I always encourage our guests, our patients, to get a blood pressure cuff and measure at home in the morning, at home in the evening, and find out what your true blood pressure is, rather than allowing a physician to throw you on these various, dangerous anti-hypertension medications.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: I’m sure you heard the American Heart Association and the College of Cardiology recently changed the guidelines for high blood pressure, and they say now, instead of 140/90, people have to be…

Dr. Hotze: There’s 130/80.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: … 130/80.

Dr. Hotze: Right.

Stacey B.: I heard that.

Dr. Hotze: Well, of course they do that, so they can put more people on blood pressure medication.

Stacey B.: That’s right.

Dr. Hotze: The pharmaceutical companies figure, “My goodness! We can make more money if we declare more people hypertensive.”

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Half of the American population. I don’t know if I said it on previous shows with you, but it bears repeating. The common story, and you’ve already started it, somebody goes into the doctor, they have white coat syndrome; now, their blood pressure’s 130, and if it’s been like that before, the doctor, or the nurse even, will say, “Well, look, it’s been high a couple of times. We’ve got to put you on a diuretic.”

Dr. Hotze: Right. Of course, what a diuretic does is it causes you to waste magnesium, and your blood pressure goes higher, and now they’re going to put you on another medication!

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Yeah, and maybe two medications.

Dr. Hotze: Right.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: One of them is often a calcium channel blocker, which is the correct idea, but they don’t know that  21:43:  magnesium is a natural calcium…

Dr. Hotze: Natural calcium channel blocker.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: …channel blocker. Then, you come back a few months later. Your blood pressure’s still elevated, by the way, and it’s getting worse, and you come back for the blood tests, and all of a sudden, your cholesterol is elevated. All of a sudden, your blood sugar is elevated. That’s because magnesium controls cholesterol and it supports your pancreas and your insulin and the way the blood sugar goes into your cells. So, all of a sudden, you’re on six drugs for magnesium deficiency.

Dr. Hotze: That’s exactly what we see over and over again here. Folks, when your doctor says you have high blood pressure and he wants to put you on medication, first thing to do is say, “Thank you,” and ask him why. He’ll tell you, well, it’s essential hypertension, which means 95% of the people have high blood pressure for no apparent reason. They just have it. “Oh, yeah, you need to lose weight and exercise, but let’s get you on blood pressure medication.”

Normally, diuretics. You lose more magnesium. Your pressure goes up. They put you on other medication, additional high blood pressure medication, and then your cholesterol’s elevated, and maybe your A1C, which measures the long term glucose in your blood, as well as your blood glucose level is elevated. Then, they say you have pre-diabetic syndrome, so they’re going to put you on metformin, and you’re on a host of medications, all of which are toxins, and which have long term adverse affects. They’re going to put you on a statin drug, too, of course. All of this could have been corrected simply by taking magnesium. I highly recommend that anyone listening to this program use natural magnesium as a preventative. 23:34:   The studies I’ve read, at least 90% of the population does not even take the adequate amount of magnesium in their diet.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: That’s right.

Dr. Hotze: The best thing to do is to take supplemental magnesium. You can take it in the form of magnesium citrate, magnesium glycinate, and those come in tablet or capsule form, or you can take it in the form of liquid ReMag, which we carry at Hotze Vitamins. Do you own the company that makes ReMag?

Dr. Carolyn Dean: We buy it from our chemist, but I own the company that sells it.

Dr. Hotze: Right.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Yeah, I own ReMag.

Dr. Hotze: Right. You’re an entrepreneur; you saw a need, and you said people need magnesium, they’re not getting it, and even in the forms they’re getting it, there’s better ways to get magnesium. So, you’ve come up with the formula, or your chemist did, to be able to provide a liquid magnesium.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Dr. Hotze: Now, I’ll mention something else. Stacey, why don’t you tell your story, because, when we had Dr. Dean on last time and I read her book, “The Magnesium Miracle,” what did I tell you? What was your problem? What did I ask you?

Magnesium Deficiency Causes Migraines

Stacey B.: Migraines were my problem. That was my symptom du jour. I suffered from that for many, many years, and it really affected my quality of life, and I was the one that had to leave parties early, or never go at all, because of my migraines. It didn’t just affect me; it affected the people around me.

Dr. Hotze: She was a party pooper.

Stacey B.: Basically, yes. I was Debbie Downer. I didn’t want to be, but I was. The only thing I knew, and this was through the conventional doctors, no one said, “This is a symptom. This is a mineral deficiency. Let’s try magnesium.” No, instead, they said let’s try you on Imitrex, let’s try you on all kinds of different…

Dr. Hotze: Haffergot and all that.

Stacey B.: …all these different migraine medications. Finally, I wound up taking Zomig, and that was the only thing that I could take that seemed to work in terms of just masking the symptom and making my headache better, but I had the same problem, month after month, year after year, and it was insane. I had to keep taking these, or I felt like I had to keep taking these drugs.

Dr. Hotze: How much did they cost per cap?

Stacey B.: Per pill? $50 dollars, and it was an orphan drug; there was no generic available, so I was stuck with the cost. So, $50 dollars a pill.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Wow

Stacey B.: And that adds up.

Dr. Hotze: What did I recommend that you do?

Stacey B.: You recommended that I take magnesium.

Dr. Hotze: And so?

Stacey B.: And progesterone.

Dr. Hotze: And?

Stacey B.: Those are the two I remember.

Dr. Hotze: How have your migraines done?

Stacey B.: Oh. Well, they have been completely resolved. I haven’t had a migraine in a few years now. Every once in awhile, I’ll get a headache, but it’s completely manageable. My migraines have been cured and I know it’s been because of a magnesium deficiency; that’s what it was.

Dr. Hotze: It may be that the man for whom you work is giving you headaches.

Stacey B.: Not at all!

Dr. Hotze: Or maybe Jimmy, your husband, gives you a headache now and then.

Stacey B.: Not at all! Don’t try and get me in trouble over here.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Yeah.

Dr. Hotze: I’m sure he would never give you a headache.

Stacey B.: Never ever.

Dr. Hotze: He is such a gentle guy, but I know I could. Those are simple stories. 27:08:  Now, listen. Migraine headaches can be caused by magnesium deficiency, and you can tell what’s causing the problem, basically, by when these migraines occur. If they occur any time of the month, and they’re not related to the cyclical events of your menstrual cycle, then they may be, as a result, a magnesium deficiency. We find also that women that end up having a migraine premenstrually oftentimes benefit from progesterone. They have a progesterone deficiency, and progesterone can resolve the migraine headaches. It can be a combination. Of course, in all our guests, we recommend magnesium intake. We always recommend that, that they take magnesium, and, of course, the women that are having the premenstrual symptoms, which can be mood swings, fluid retention, weight gain, headaches, migraine headaches, dysfunctional uterine bleeding or fibroids. Of course, we’re always going to put them on natural, bioidentical progesterone, as well.

Food Allergies Can Cause Migraines

Another thing that can cause headaches, since I’m mentioning it, or migraines, can be food allergies. Some people do have food allergies…

Stacey B.: That’s true.

Dr. Hotze: …and the common foods, wheat, corn, egg, milk or yeast or soybean are the big six, and any one, or a combination of those, can cause migraine headaches, but the easiest thing to do is to take magnesium. You can get that over the counter, for crying out loud, and it’s inexpensive. Think about it: $50 dollars a pill for Zomig, and I’m going to take oral magnesium instead, which costs a pittance, a few dollars, and you could have buckets of it. Bottles full of magnesium for a modicum…For $50 dollars, you could have more magnesium to last you quite awhile.

Stacey B.: That’s right.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Also, don’t forget the excitotoxins. The aspartame…

Dr. Hotze: Right. Aspartame.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: …and MSG.

Dr. Hotze: Yes.

Stacey B.: Oh, absolutely.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: All these poor people on diet drinks and diet foods, thinking that “diet” means healthy, and they don’t know that this aspartame is definitely an excitotoxin that affects the brain.

Dr. Hotze: That’s exactly right. These are different things that can cause your headaches. It can cause migraine headaches, but a very common cause…you want to eliminate all these toxins. Get off the junk food. Get on a healthy eating program. Good, healthy oils. We recommend fish oil, olive oil. I use cod liver oil. In fact, I had two tablespoons this morning, plus my fish oil. Good oils. Avocados. Eggs, butter. Eat real oil. Eat a lot of good, fresh vegetables, preferably organic, so you don’t have all the pesticides in them, and a modicum amount of meat. Eliminate your sugar, eliminate your simple carbohydrates, because those are processed foods. If it’s in a can, package or box, just don’t consume it. That’s easier said than done, but that can be a big benefit to you, if you’ll get on what we call a paleo eating program, or you can get on a ketogenic eating program, and these are both very helpful, but you want to make sure you get adequate amounts of magnesium.

Magnesium Deficiency and Heart Problems

Magnesium also, as you mentioned, you had some problem with cardiac arrhythmia, irregular beats in your heart, and that magnesium also regulates your heart rhythm. That’s why, when people came into the emergency room with a heart attack and they had an irregular rhythm, I would immediately order magnesium sulfate IV, because they had low magnesium levels. If you have cramping, muscle cramping, then, what you need to do is take magnesium. That’s a common sign of magnesium deficiency.

Magnesium Deficiency and Gastroesophageal Reflux

Interestingly enough, as Dr. Dean has described, gastroesophageal reflux may be due to constrictions within the muscle of the esophagus that causes the stomach to regurgitate back onto the esophagus some of the acid, and relaxing that with magnesium may prove to be beneficial.

Magnesium Needed for Energy Production Within Your Cells

Magnesium is so critical for the production of energy within your cells. All your cells have power plants. Every power plant in your cell produces energy, and it’s electrical energy that’s produced in these power plants called mitochondria, and within the mitochondria, we have a process of producing electrical energy, which is carried by a molecule called adenosine triphosphate, which comes out of the Kreb cycle, and you need magnesium to be able to make adenosine triphosphate, and to be able to transfer your electrons to a usable form, so they can be transported into the cells, to the various area of the cells where the biochemical processes occur, so you’ll have energy for the cells to operate and function at an optimal level.

The key to good health is high energy production. The cause of poor health is low energy production. This all happens within the cells. If your cells are healthy and your power plants are producing a lot of energy, guess what? Then, you’re going to be healthy and well.

Fluoride Toxicity Causes Magnesium Deficiency

By the way, the thyroid hormone is very essential for that, and, just as an aside, we drink a lot of fluoride in our water in America. It’s fluoridated. We have fluoride in the toothpaste, in a host of other products. Fluoride poisons an enzyme within your cells that adversely affects that enzyme’s ability to convert the inactive thyroid hormone, T4, that has four iodine molecules, to T3, which is the active thyroid hormone that has three iodine molecules. Fluoride can cause you to have all the signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism, no matter what your blood tests say.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: You know what’s interesting about the fluoride, Dr. Hotze, is I’ve seen so many drugs be shifted to fluoride drugs now. In order to get across the fatty barrier in cells, they started adding fluoride to most of the common drugs. What happens is, in the intestinal flora, these drugs are broken down by the organisms and the fluoride is released…

Dr. Hotze: There you go.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: …and fluoride binds with magnesium, irreversibly, creating a magnesium-fluoride compound called [cellate 33:46], and it’s a brittle compound that deposits in bones, makes them brittle. Deposits in tendons, causes the tendon rupture that is a side effect of Ciprofloxacin, the antibiotic that’s given out like candy. We’ve got a major problem with all these fluoride drugs. What are they? Celebrex, Cipro, Prozac, Paxil, Lipitor, Flecainide. Flecainide is an anti-arrhythmic drug. It has six fluoride molecules and its side effects are irregular heartbeat and shortness of breath and wheezing and nerve damage. Desflurane, that’s an inhaled anesthetic, six fluoride molecules. What happens there? I know you’ve heard it from your clients and guests where, after a surgery, people say, “I just never could get well.” That can be because all that anesthetic bound up their magnesium. It’s unbelievable.

Dr. Hotze: That’s a very important point. Although, I knew some of the drugs had fluoride in them, I wasn’t aware how ubiquitous it was. Let me tell you, listeners out there, these drugs are toxic. They’re toxic in and of themselves, and when they add fluoride to the drugs, it makes them even more toxic and it increases the toxic load on your body, it binds up the magnesium and you can’t produce the energy in your cells from the power plants, the mitochondria that you need to live optimally. It keeps you continually sick, and you have more and more symptoms, and the conventional doctors will only offer you more masking band-aiding of your symptoms with more pharmaceutical drugs. That’s why Sherry Rogers says, “If you take these drugs, and you will get sicker, quicker.” Sicker, quicker, on pharmaceutical drugs. That’s why I have been a proponent of natural approaches to health.

The reason people are sick and have the diseases of aging that occur, whether it’s obesity, overweightness… By the way, I want to make a mention on fluoride, since we started putting fluoride in the water and in our toothpaste and the dentists use it.  Don’t let the dentists give you any fluoride. For crying out loud, that is just crazy. What that has done in America, we have an obesity problem of 35% of the population. 70% of the population is overweight. In 1960, 16% of the population was overweight, 8% were obese. In Europe, where they drink wine, eat pasta, olive oil, have tons of bread, 16% of the population is overweight, 8% is obese. Now, we’ve had a dramatic increase of overweightness and obesity in America, and I say it’s directly related to the fluoridation of the water and the fluoride in the toothpaste and in the various food and home products that we have and that we’re exposed to, and now in the drugs that you’re prescribed. So, you have hypothyroidism. That causes you to develop hypothyroidism and it’s an epidemic in

America that goes totally unrecognized by conventional physicians. In Europe, the reason they have such a low rate of overweightness and obesity is they don’t put fluoride in the water.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Well, the thing about thyroid that I learned after I did the ReMag, and I found my thyroid seemed a little stronger. I had been on 60 milligrams of armor, but I got my chemist to make a multiple mineral, and when I started taking that and testing it, it wasn’t more than two months before I found my pulse rate a little higher, my hands almost hot, and I was a little more active, and I realized, “Oh my gosh! My thyroid has kicked in.”

Dr. Hotze: I think what that really is, is that the thyroid, now, at the cellular level in the power plants, when it activates the mitochondria, because you’re taking adequate amounts of the magnesium and other key vitamins, such as vitamin C, which is absolutely critical to good health in human beings…monkeys, guinea pigs don’t make vitamin C, but all the other mammals on God’s creation, all the other vertebrates, make vitamin C at approximately 1,000 milligrams per 25 pounds of body weight. That’s why I always recommend you should be on at least 6,000 milligrams of vitamin C every day. If you’re sick, double up on that. If you’re really sick and you come down with the flu or something like that, come in and get an IV of vitamin C in high doses, and that can help alleviate, stop and eliminate those problems very quickly.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: But what I found was there are nine minerals that are needed in the thyroid hormone chain. Nine minerals. We think of iodine, but then, people will OD on iodine. You just really need the RDAs, especially if the mineral is well absorbed, but then you need the selenium, and then you need the manganese and the zinc, and that’s been, to me, such a boon, because we don’t have to wait for people’s thyroid to punk out to give thyroid hormone replacement. We can get the body’s hormones making themselves. I think what magnesium is doing is binding up a lot of that fluoride that’s in our environment and in our diets, so that it stops attacking the thyroid.

Dr. Hotze: Well, that’s a very important point, and an interesting point. Well, Dr. Dean, I want to tell you this has been a very interesting discussion. We can go on, I’m sure, for another hour or two. I hope for our listeners that this has been eye-opening to you on how a natural supplement, a natural mineral like magnesium, which is available all across the country at any vitamin store or health food store, you can get magnesium, highly recommend that you do that and begin to take…how many milligrams a day on an average would you say, let’s say they don’t have your ReMag. What would you recommend? Magnesium glycinate or citrate? How many milligrams a day would you recommend?

Dr. Carolyn Dean: Well, I start people on the magnesium citrate, the powdered forms, because, you see, that way, you can put it in liquid and treat it like a liquid that you can sip throughout the day. It’s people who take their full dose all at once that will create the laxative effect. You have less chance for that, if you sip through the day. I really think twice the RDA is the best amount, around 600 milligrams.

Dr. Hotze: Right.

Dr. Carolyn Dean: I had to take 1,200 milligrams of my ReMag to get rid of my palpitations, and now, I only need 300. It’s one of these nutrients that your body stocks up and stores, and then you just take a maintenance.

Dr. Hotze: Now, that’s very important. Well, listen. Thank you again, Dr. Dean, for being with us today and for your very enlightening discussion on magnesium.

Stacey B.: Dr. Dean, for people who want to find out more about you and your books, what website should we direct them to

Dr. Carolyn Dean: The best website is DrCarolynDean.com, and books, archives, radio show are at DrCarolynDeanLive.com.

Stacey B.: DrCarolynDean.com. All right, we’ve got it. I know people will enjoy hearing more about you. It was a fascinating conversation on magnesium, which is something that most Americans are deficient in. Of course, if you wanted to do a 180 and take charge of your health today, then you can always give us a call at 218-698-8698. That’s 218-698-8698. You’ve been listening to Dr. Hotze’s Wellness Revolution.

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